Restaurant rivalries: Which coffee, Mexican food, and burger brands keep customers happy?

Will you get the better breakfast at Starbucks or Dunkin’? Does Chipotle or Taco Bell have higher quality Mexican food? Which burger joint has the fastest service?

While the ACSI can never answer these questions definitively, we can tell you what customers think about everything from food quality to store speed to mobile ordering.

When we look at scores for some of the biggest restaurant rivalries in the business, we get a new perspective on what’s working and where these brands could focus their efforts to improve customer satisfaction.

Starbucks vs. Dunkin: Top coffee brands face off on food

Last year, Starbucks and Dunkin’ were dead even in their overall ACSI customer satisfaction scores. This year, Starbucks inched up 1% to take the lead, 79 to 78.

In terms of beverage quality, Starbucks and Dunkin’ tie, but Starbucks has a slight lead in the variety of beverages. Where things get interesting is in the food. Both restaurants have been putting more resources behind their food offerings.

At its annual shareholders meeting in 2018, Starbucks revealed its intention to double its food business by 2021. Dunkin’ recently beefed up its breakfast options, debuting a new Egg White Bowl and Sausage Scramble Bowl to compete with the likes of McDonald’s, Taco Bell, and Panera, not to mention Starbucks.

Starbucks has a small advantage over Dunkin’ on food quality according to customers, but customers give Dunkin’ better marks for variety of food as it edges out Starbucks. These results aren’t in the same echelon as the two brands’ drinks, but it will be interesting to see how the scores evolve as both brands continue to expand and enhance their food menus.

One area where both are especially strong is mobile. Starbucks stands out for the quality of its mobile app, while Dunkin’ is close behind. Customers also give Starbucks higher marks for the reliability of its mobile app compared to Dunkin’.

Chipotle vs. Taco Bell: Digital and delivery from top Mexican food chains

Chipotle’s overall ACSI score plummeted in 2016 following its food safety crisis, and still hasn’t returned to its pre-crisis score, but it has shown incremental improvement, rising 1% this year to a respectable score of 80. Its same-store sales are also improving, up 10% in the first quarter of 2019. Taco Bell now sits at 75 after a 1% gain of its own.

Despite its struggle to return to its pre-crisis ACSI score, Chipotle still outstrips Taco Bell in food quality. And while Taco Bell has a strong showing in order accuracy, Chipotle again ranks higher.

Both restaurants are moving quickly to cater to a new generation of mobile-first customers seeking convenience. Both brands have launched delivery options — Taco Bell through GrubHub, Chipotle through DoorDash — and are ramping up digital operations.

But when rating mobile apps, Chipotle again is the clear winner, scoring high for both the quality and reliability of its mobile app, with Taco Bell lagging behind in both categories.

Wendy’s, Burger King, Red Robin, or McDonald’s: Who has the fastest fast-food burger?

Red Robin, in the full-service restaurant category, has the highest overall ACSI score among the four burger restaurants at 79. Among fast-food chains, Wendy’s leads with a score of 77, followed by Burger King at 76. McDonald’s sits at the bottom of all fast-food restaurants at 69.

When it comes to courtesy, the scores tell a similar story. One thing you don’t often see in the service industry is high scores for courtesy. But these burger joints are serving up a different trend.

Red Robin scores high for courtesy, followed by Wendy’s and Burger King close behind with respectable scores of their own. McDonald’s, however, lags the field in a distant fourth place.

McDonald’s has been trying to modernize its operations, adding self-order kiosks, digital menu boards, and curbside pick-up for mobile orders. So far those efforts haven’t improved its overall ACSI score, but did it do anything to improve its speed in fulfilling orders?

Not according to customers. McDonald’s scored well below the category average for speed of checkout or delivery. The fastest burger is from Wendy’s, but Burger King and Red Robin are close behind. Unlike the standout courtesy scores, the store speed for all four burger chains is pretty low across the board.

Does competition bring out the best of the brands?

Every one of these restaurants is making moves to improve and expand their menus, better cater to changing consumer tastes, and advance their mobile technology and delivery capabilities to serve customers the way they prefer to order and receive their food.

While brand rivals certainly fuel the strategy to some degree, restaurants should also make sure they’re listening closely to their customers, who are ultimately the only judge that matters in the competitive restaurant industry.

The secret to telecommunications success? It could be in the palm of your hand.

The customer satisfaction scores in telecommunications might not actually tell the whole story.

From a big picture standpoint, the results from our recent Telecommunications Report aren’t that surprising. Out of the five telecommunications industries we examined – video streaming service, subscription TV, internet service providers (ISPs), fixed-line telephone service, and video-on-demand service – only video streaming made a lasting impression, climbing 1.3% to an ACSI score of 76 (out of 100).

Fixed-telephone service was second with a score of 71, followed by video-on-demand service at 67. ISPs and subscription TV service each scored 62, tied for last place among the individual industries.

However, upon a closer examination of the various benchmarks, it would appear that one element may be more crucial to – as well as a clear indicator of – a company’s customer satisfaction: mobile apps.

Going mobile

Per a survey from the National Center for Health Statistics, 53.9% of U.S. households have done away with landlines completely, choosing to use cell phones only. This is a far cry from the 2006 survey, when only 15.8% reported no longer having a landline.

The fact is, people are becoming more reliant on their mobile phones, and as such, mobile apps are becoming a more important piece of the customer satisfaction puzzle.

Companies that place a greater emphasis on their mobile apps recognize this growing shift in customer needs. We’re seeing this in telecommunications, where higher mobile app scores tend to correlate to higher satisfaction scores overall.

The better the mobile app…

We’re not saying that mobile apps are solely responsible for a company’s overall satisfaction, but it certainly helps.

Netflix (79) and Sony’s PlayStationVue (78) have the highest scores among video streaming services, and users are also happy with the quality and reliability of their mobile apps.

Verizon’s Fios and AT&T’s U-verse TV, which tied for the top ACSI score among video-on-demand services at 72, also have high-quality mobile apps that customers find reliable.

The same goes for Verizon’s Fios (70) and AT&T Internet (69) in the ISP industry, and AT&T’s U-verse TV (69) and Verizon’s Fios (68) in subscription TV services.

The worse the mobile app…

On the flip side, companies with low-quality and unreliable mobile apps tend to see similar results in overall customer satisfaction.

Frontier Communications sits near the bottom of subscription television services at 57 and lacks a satisfactory mobile app. The company also has the lowest score (61) among fixed-line telephone services.

Charter’s Spectrum is in a similar boat among video-on-demand services. It has the lowest ACSI score in the industry at 64 and a less-than-reliable mobile app to match.

AT&T’s DirectTV Now and Sony’s Crackle fit the same bill among video streaming services. The former finished second to last and the latter took the bottom spot at 69 and 68 respectively. Both also have mobile apps that do not have the quality and reliability as compared to the rest of the video streaming industry.

There are always outliers

Of course, just because a company lacks in the mobile satisfaction category doesn’t guarantee its overall customer satisfaction will suffer. There are outliers.

DISH Network’s Sling TV has one of the top mobile apps according to customers, yet sits closer to the bottom of video streaming services with an ACSI score of 74.

Mediacom has the second-lowest score among subscription TV services at 56, but has one of the highest-rated mobile apps, both in terms of quality and reliability.

It’s not an exact science, and there are obviously a number of factors that go into customers’ overall satisfaction with a brand. But mobile apps definitely shouldn’t be overlooked when it comes to the customer experience.

Making mobile apps a priority moving forward

The game has changed. Consumers regularly stream shows, watch videos, and scour the internet on their phones, and it plays a major role in how they perceive brands.

For these reasons, we’ve started measuring – and placing a significant emphasis on – mobile app satisfaction. While there are exceptions, for the most part mobile app success in the telecom sector has some correlation to overall customer satisfaction.

Given the mobile trend is likely here to stay, telecommunication companies aiming to improve satisfaction might want to pour more resources into refining the quality and reliability of their mobile apps.

The energy utilities sector should give the people what they want: More green initiatives

Do you know what the energy utilities sector needs? A spark. Badly.

Energy utilities suffered a sector-wide plunge in customer satisfaction, falling 2.7 percent to an ACSI score of 73.2 (out of 100), per our latest Energy Utilities Report.

Despite record-high U.S. natural gas production and exponential growth in electricity generation from renewable energy sources, all three categories of energy utilities took a significant hit in customer satisfaction. Cooperative dropped 2.6 percent to 75, and investor-owned and municipal both fell 2.7 percent into a tie at 73.

Prices are high, the weather has been extreme, and there’s been a decline in electric power reliability. Yet, as it turns out, if there’s one area that has truly hindered customer experience, it’s green initiatives. Specifically, a lack thereof.

Green programs are failing across the board

Efforts to support green programs are flat or falling in all three categories.

For those efforts, cooperative utilities received an ACSI score of 74 (unchanged), municipal utilities had a score of 70 (down 4 percent), and investor-owned utilities came in with a score of 70 (down 3 percent).

This is not good. In fact, it’s worse than not good – it’s bottom-of-the-barrel bad. The customer experience benchmark for green programs is the worst, or tied for the worst, individual benchmark in each of the three energy utility categories.

What’s the takeaway here? Customers are clamoring for eco-friendly solutions.

Some providers are taking these concerns more seriously than others.

Companies committing to green initiatives  

Consumers Energy, a subsidiary of CMS Energy, is dedicated to a “triple bottom line,” according to CEO Patti Poppe.

As part of its commitment to “people, planet, and prosperity,” the company became the first U.S. borrower to enter into “syndicated sustainability-linked revolving credit facilities.” By meeting certain sustainability goals, CMS can reduce the interest rate on its $1.4 billion loan from Barclays. Consumers Energy has a goal of 40 percent renewable energy by 2040 and recently announced plans to develop its third solar power plant.

Back in April, MidAmerican Energy, which is part of Berkshire Hathaway Energy, was named one of the U.S.’s top “environmental champion” utilities for the fourth straight year, based on a nationwide pre-Earth Day survey. Consumers look at the following five categories as part of the study: “promoting clean energy, enabling consumption management, facilitating environmental causes, encouraging environmentally friendly fleets and buildings, and consistently seeking ways to protect the environment.”

As much as we’d like to believe these providers are taking on these responsibilities out of the goodness of their hearts, it’s important not to overlook the obvious business implications. You see, there is a younger generation on the precipice of becoming the country’s largest living generation. And this group is not going to let the planet fall by the wayside.

Millennials in the market

When it comes to eco-friendly endeavors and green program initiatives, millennials definitely have something to say.

In its “2018 State of the Consumer” report, the Smart Energy Consumer Collaborative (SECC) took a deep look at millennials’ interest in renewable energy. And let’s just say this generation is all about it.

While 41 percent of consumers said they’d be willing to pay an extra $15 a month for access to clean energy, over two-thirds of millennials were open to forking over the extra cash. Over half of millennials are intrigued by the concept of solar panels.

Clearly these consumers believe protecting the planet is worth the cost.

Go green or go home

We’d be remiss to claim that all utilities providers have to do to regain favor with their customers is to fix their “green” problem. However, what is clear is that the consumers have spoken – and they are in support of more green initiatives.

Some companies have heard the call and are taking action. Others would be wise to follow their lead.

Beer lovers love their beer more than ever before

The beer industry is at a crossroads of sorts. Millennials just aren’t that into beer. According to a report from Berenberg Research, Generation Z feels the same way, opting instead to reach for spirits. As a result, beer consumption and sales are down. This, however, is only part of the story.

Beer might not be the libation of choice for everyone, but for those that do choose brew, one word best describes their feelings toward the beverage: Love.

According to our most recent Nondurable Products Report, customer satisfaction with breweries is at an all-time high, climbing 1.2 percent to an ACSI score of 85 (on a scale of 0 to 100). Interestingly enough, it’s the “little” guys leading the charge among beer aficionados.

Smaller breweries, big-time satisfaction

Beer lovers are a passionate bunch. And craft beer drinkers might be the most passionate of them all. With a 1 percent jump over the past year, small breweries and craft beers, which the ACSI categorizes under “other breweries,” have the highest customer satisfaction among industry manufacturers, with an ACSI score of 86.

This group also leads the competition in many other aspects of customer experience, including perceived overall quality and perceived value. It’s clear that while the microbrews and small breweries lack the size of the big brands, they’re benefiting from the strong reputation they’ve built with their customer base.

Competition is good for the beer market

Competition tends to breed competition. We’re seeing the positive effects that “other breweries” are having on the rest of the category, generally propelling higher satisfaction across the entire market. This is most notable in the higher customer satisfaction with Anheuser-Busch InBev.

The megabrewery is up 1 percent in customer satisfaction year over year, giving it an ACSI score of 85, good enough for second place in the category. Anheuser-Busch InBev is thriving because of high marks in website satisfaction, customer retention, and most importantly, customer loyalty.

Bottom of the barrel

Although breweries have high marks in customer satisfaction overall, not every manufacturer is improving. Molson Coors saw its customer satisfaction take a major dip, plummeting 4 percent to a score of 81.

In fact, following a 4.8 percent dip in first quarter 2018 sales, the megabrewery opted to cease production on its MillerCoors line of Two Hats, essentially giving up on the brand that was intended to appeal to the millennial crowd. The manufacturer hopes to rebound by turning its attention to Coors Light.

The future of the beer industry

Microbrews and craft beers aren’t a fad. These “other breweries” have a loyal following, and its customers are drawn to a quality product. Inauthenticity isn’t going to fly with this crowd. Hopefully, the bigger beer manufacturers take note, and make the necessary adjustments to keep up with beer lovers’ preferences.

Regardless of what the future holds, one thing is clear: customer satisfaction with breweries is the highest we’ve ever seen. We can all agree to raise a glass to that.

How millennials are reshaping the restaurant industry

Millennials spend more on dining out than any other demographic, to the tune of $92 billion in 2016. That number is only expected to grow as their earnings increase.

So it’s no surprise that millennial tastes are reshaping restaurants, from the food they serve to the way it’s ordered. That means food trending toward natural, organic, and plant-based. Some 40 percent of millennials are reportedly taking on a plant-based diet.

While millennials eat out, they also like to order in, prompting technological changes in how restaurants take orders, accept payments, and design their websites and mobile apps.

Restaurants’ ability to meet new preferences and expectations in the last year has had a significant effect on their ACSI scores. After a drop last year, full-service restaurants rose 3.8 percent to 81. Fast food edged up 1.3 percent to 80.

But where the improvements—and the need for improvement—are most obvious is in the ACSI scores for every element of customer satisfaction.

What restaurants are getting right?

Full-service, sit-down restaurants have improved across nearly all aspects of the customer experience.

Food order accuracy remains a strong point with a score of 89, up 2 percent year over year. Restaurant staff are more courteous and helpful—another 2 percent gain to 87.

Food quality (up 4 percent to 87) and food variety (up 4 percent to 86) show strong gains in areas that cater to millennial preferences for fresh, quality ingredients and customization. Beverage quality (86) and variety (83) are also much improved this year.

Full-service restaurant layout and cleanliness rates well at 86 and continues to exceed the fast food industry (84).

Fast food restaurants are right behind the full-service category in highly accurate order fulfillment, rising 1 percent year over year to 88. It remains by far the top-rated aspect of the fast food experience. Staff do a good job of serving customers (85) and food quality rose 1 percent to 85.

The element that improves the most is also the fast food industry’s reason for being: speed of check-out or delivery. Service speed is up 2 percent to 84.

Where restaurants have room to improve

Food-to-table service from full-service restaurants is quicker (up 2 percent to 83), but lags fast food check-out and delivery speed (84).

The only element to weaken for the full-service category is website satisfaction (83). This should alarm restaurants as online ordering continues to gain traction with customers and off-premise dining becomes more critical for boosting sales.

Unlike the full-service segment, fast food beverage quality has not improved (84) and beverage variety is somewhat lacking (79 compared to 83 for full service). Food variety is at the lower end of the spectrum, steady at 81. Fast food website satisfaction, unchanged at 82, is close to that of full-service restaurants (83).

Restaurants that are getting it right

Among both full-service and fast-food restaurants, several brands improved significantly over the last year. That can be attributed at least in part to the various improvements they undertook, many of which cater to millennial tastes.

Red Robin jumped 8 percent to an ACSI score of 79. In the last year, it rolled out a veggie burger. It tested a new delivery-only concept that operates without a traditional storefront in downtown Chicago. It embraced digital ordering, allowing customers to place orders with a specific pick-up time, prepay, and customize burgers just as they would at a physical Red Robin location.

TGI Friday’s, up 4 percent year over year to a score of 79, is taking delivery to a new level by delivering alcohol as well as food—a new concept for restaurants. It also partnered with Beyond Meat to offer its plant-based Beyond Burger. It has invested heavily in technology, from Alexa skills to virtual bartenders.

On the fast food side, Pizza Hut, which jumped 5 percent to a score of 80, is also testing beer and wine delivery, and might soon deliver pizzas with autonomous delivery trucks. It also rolled out a new loyalty program that rewards online orders.

Millennials have been blamed for ruining everything from running to napkins. Their preferences are certainly reshaping industries. But, at least in the case of restaurants, their desire for choice and customization; fresh, quality ingredients; and a better ordering experience on websites and mobile apps is moving both full-service and fast food restaurants in a positive direction.

Customer satisfaction with hospitals grows as health care sector shifts

One word defines health care right now: consolidation.

Pharmacy benefits managers (PBMs) are merging with insurers. United Health Group led the charge a few years ago, buying Catamaran. Now CVS is buying Aetna and Cigna is buying Express Scripts. Walmart is in talks to buy Humana. Some see this as motivated by the potential for Amazon to leap into the health care space; the major players are joining forces to ensure they’ll be able to compete.

But the joining of PBMs with insurers could have an effect on hospitals as well.

UnitedHealth bought Surgical Care Affiliates to expand into primary and urgent care in ambulances, and picked up a physician group, moving closer to direct delivery of medical care. CVS and Aetna plan to add community medical clinics to their repertoire. Walmart already operates retail health clinics and has said it would begin offering lab-testing services in some stores.

The $18 billion urgent care center space is expected to grow nearly 6 percent in 2018, building on the more than 7,600 urgent care centers in the U.S. as of June 2017. The number of centers in 2017 was up nearly 10 percent over 2015.

The surge in clinics could be the reason that customer satisfaction with emergency room services jumped 6 percent since last year, to an ACSI score of 73.

That was the most dramatic change in the health care and social assistance sector, and drove the 1.3 percent increase in customer satisfaction with hospitals.

Inpatient hospital care saw a 1 percent rise to an ACSI score of 77. The gains in ER and inpatient care helped offset a decline for outpatient care, which ebbed 3 percent to 78.

Patient satisfaction with ambulatory care (office visits to doctors, dentists, optometrists, and mental health professionals) held steady at 77 for the third year in a row.

Among patients 51 years and up, satisfaction with hospitals was much higher, at a score of 80, than among those 18-50 years old, where it stood at just 72. The difference in satisfaction between the two age groups was most pronounced in outpatient care and emergency room services, where ACSI scores among those 51 and up were 10 points higher than scores for those 18-50.

It will be interesting to see the effect that continued growth of urgent care clinics will have on ER perception moving forward. And when Amazon, along with its collaborators JPMorgan Chase and Berkshire Hathaway, does make moves in health care, it will be anyone’s guess how the health care and social assistance sector, and patients’ satisfaction with its services, will respond.

UPS tops FedEx in customer satisfaction, as Amazon appears on the horizon

Amazon overshadows many industries, as we saw last month in the retail sector. Now, consumer shipping, long the beneficiary of all those Amazon orders, is bracing for a future in which Amazon makes its own deliveries.

The Wall Street Journal last month reported that Amazon is planning to launch “Shipping with Amazon,” a delivery service for businesses shipping to consumers. Of course it would take years for Amazon to build a parcel delivery network at the scale of United Parcel Service (UPS) and FedEx, but even the specter of Amazon should be enough for the established players in the shipping industry to redouble their efforts in serving customers.

Where do they stand right now?

Customer satisfaction with consumer shipping was stable at an ACSI score of 81 (out of 100), but UPS jumped into the lead at 82, growing 1 percent over 2017. FedEx fell 1 percent to 81. The U.S. Postal Service’s Express and Priority Mail business climbed 1 percent, but remains a distant third place at 76.

Customers gave top marks to shippers for delivering packages in good condition (88) and making it easy to track shipments (86). Customers who visited a post office or a UPS or FedEx store feel that service staff members were slightly less courteous and helpful this year (85), but all other customer experience benchmarks remained the same.

It might seem easy to write off the U.S. Postal Service’s Express and Priority Mail business, which remains well behind the category’s leaders in terms of overall customer satisfaction. But it’s actually tied with FedEx in customer loyalty and has a lower percentage of customer complaints. UPS had the best scores in the industry for each of those measures.

With Amazon dipping its toes in the shipping space and, according to the Wall Street Journal, threatening to undercut UPS and FedEx pricing, the shipping giants can only rely on their established infrastructure so long. Investing in customer service could continue to set these companies apart.

Drug store mergers heat up as retailers defend against the Amazon threat

Among retailers, health and personal care stores were one of the bright spots in our latest Retail Report 2017.

Just like supermarkets, health and personal care stores climbed one point to an ACSI score of 79. While that doesn’t match the 82 of internet retailers, it’s a high score, and the improvement points to the results of both M&A and preparations for Amazon to enter the space.

But that vote of confidence from customers is just the prelude to a shake up that the industry’s many mergers are creating.

The leaders shed points, but still lead

Kmart pharmacies and Kroger were tied at a score of 80 at the top of the health and personal care industry. However, both saw their ACSI score fall in 2017, with Kmart pharmacies shedding 4 points and Kroger down 1 point. Kmart pharmacies did show significant improvement in service quality, and both brands improved in meeting customer expectations.

CVS customer satisfaction powered by and preparing for mergers

CVS was right behind the leaders at a company-best 78. It was the most improved in the category, gaining 2 points, and one of only two large chains to improve over 2016.

Acquiring Target pharmacies may have boosted CVS’s customer satisfaction scores. When dividing CVS’s score into CVS and Target pharmacies, Target stands at a score of 80, while CVS sits at 77.

The health care retailer’s possible merger with Aetna is suspected to be a preemptive move to counter the threat of Amazon, which may begin selling prescription medicine. Whether this merger will boost customer satisfaction – or even go through – remains to be seen.

Rite Aid split among Albertsons and Walgreens

Rite Aid, which fell 1 point in 2017 to a score of 77, is in the middle of being purchased.

Walgreens is snatching up 1,932 Rite Aids (it tried to buy all of them before antitrust scrutiny led to a scaled-back deal). And now Albertsons plans to buy the remaining 2,500 Rite Aids, further expanding its footprint after merging with Safeway in 2015.

It seems many of the health and personal care stores toward the bottom of the ACSI rankings are banding together in hopes of better serving customers and getting ahead of Amazon’s potential entrance in the market.

Walgreens gained a point in 2017 to tie Rite Aid at 77. Safeway pharmacies was just a point higher at 78 after plummeting five points from last year, a drop of 6 percent. Declines in customer loyalty and perceived value contributed to the fall.

Perhaps the many mergers and acquisitions will give these stores more resources to improve customer satisfaction.

The elephant in the room

In the end, M&A in the health and personal care space, as well as the improvements in service quality and meeting customer expectations, are all about Amazon. The potential for the dominant internet retailer to enter the space and push out any and all competitors has many companies making big moves to shore up their ranks.

If Amazon steps into the space, a focus on customer satisfaction will be critical to winning customer loyalty and dollars.

Customer Satisfaction Challenge Ahead for Charter as TWC, Bright House Phase Out

Just one year ago, Time Warner Cable (TWC) tumbled to last place for customer satisfaction among 300+ companies in the ACSI. Along with TWC, Comcast showed the biggest ACSI loss among subscription television providers, a situation that has turned around in 2016. This year’s gains for Comcast and TWC (14% and 16%, respectively), come close to reversing two years of losing satisfaction, but neither company breaks out of the bottom quartile of the ACSI. While Comcast failed to nail down a marriage with TWC, Charter Communications is tying the knot, which will bring an end to the TWC brand.

blog-pay-tv-trends-2016

ACSI results show Charter’s customer satisfaction fluctuating, now down 6% to 60 as the company begins its stint as the second largest U.S. cable operator following acquisitions of TWC and Bright House Networks. Among broadband players, Bright House at 66 is a cut above most. Nevertheless, like all cable companies, Bright House lags behind the fiber optic leaders of the pay TV industry, Verizon Fios (70) and AT&T U-verse (69), as well as satellite operators DIRECTV (68) and DISH Network (67). As a group, cable companies bring up the rear, but the range of scores is broad—from the above-average showing of Bright House and Cablevision to the last-place performance of Mediacom (54).

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Mergers overwhelmingly dampen customer satisfaction in the short term, which could spell trouble for Bright House customers as the brand phases out and combines with Charter. For Charter, the challenge will be keeping satisfaction levels from falling further as it takes on a bigger slice of the market.

Bloomberg.com: So Long Time Warner Cable: Charter to Retire Maligned Brand »

Charlotte Observer: Customer Satisfaction Improves for Cable, Internet Providers »

CRM Buyer: Pay TV Firms Eke Out Tiny Gains in Customer Satisfaction »

Marketing Daily: Telecom Customer Satisfaction Improving, Slightly »

Multichannel News: Cable Stops Slide But Remains in ACSI Cellar »

Philly.com: Comcast Service Ratings are Better, But Still Low »

Yahoo! Finance: New Customer Service Survey Says Comcast is No Longer the Worst »

Smartphones 2016: It’s a Galaxy and iPhone Universe

When it comes to pleasing consumers, the smartphone market is essentially a two-horse race, with Apple and Samsung running nearly neck-and-neck for the past two years. In 2014, Samsung gained an advantage in ACSI overall, posting 81 on a 0-100 scale to Apple’s 79, but the two market leaders deadlocked the next year.

Results from a recent report by the American Customer Satisfaction Index show Apple inching ahead to grab the customer satisfaction lead in 2016, propelling the cell phone industry average up to 79 (+1.3%). Lenovo’s Motorola Mobility comes in a distant third at 77 (-3%).

samsung-apple-cellphones

Drilling down to the brand level reveals a preponderance of Samsung and Apple devices at the top, led by Samsung’s Galaxy Note5 at 86. Apple’s iPhone 6s Plus is a mere point behind at 85, while two more Galaxy phones clock in at 84 (S6 edge+ and Note 4). Altogether, a dozen Apple or Samsung models score above the industry ACSI average of 79, with only Motorola’s Moto G penetrating this group at 81.

smartphone-brands

In general, phones with bigger screen sizes are more satisfying to users. The top four devices in 2016 sport displays that range from 5.5 to 5.7 inches. Among the newest iPhones, Plus models do better than their base versions (iPhone 6s Plus and 6 Plus edge 2 points ahead of 6s and 6, respectively). There are exceptions; for example, the Galaxy S III (4.8-inch display) does quite well with an ACSI score of 80. This older Samsung model ties Galaxy S6 and nudges past S4, S5, and Grand Prime (screen sizes of 5.0 to 5.1 inches).

smartphone-size

CNET.com: Apple’s Only Thiiisss Much Better Than Samsung in Customer Satisfaction »

Investor’s Business Daily: Samsung Phones Top Apple iPhones in Customer Satisfaction »

SlashGear: Galaxy Note 5 Beats All Other Phones in Customer Satisfaction Index »